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Geography and Culture

Page history last edited by Angela Cunningham 11 years, 2 months ago

 


Core Content for Assessment

 

Multiple Choice

ORQs

Activities

Resources

Elements of Culture 

       

SS-HS-2.1.1 - Introduce

Students will explain how belief systems, knowledge, technology and behavior patterns define cultures and help to explain historical perspectives and events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 2  

MMMM, M

 O,O 

 

 

 

Social Institutions

       

SS-HS-2.2.1

Students will explain how various human needs are met through interaction in and among social institutions (e.g., family, religion, education, government, economy) in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).                  

MM 

 

 

 

Interactions Among Individuals and Groups 

       

SS-HS-2.3.1 - Introduce

Students will explain the reasons why conflict and competition (e.g., violence, difference of opinion, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, genocide) may develop as cultures emerge in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 2                         

MM

 

 

 

SS-HS-2.3.2 - Introduce

Students will explain and give examples of how compromise and cooperation are characteristics that influence interaction (e.g., peace studies, treaties, conflict resolution) in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 2

       
Scarcity        

SS-HS-3.1.1 - Introduce

Students will give examples of and explain how scarcity of resources necessitates choices at both the personal and societal levels in the modern world (1500 AD to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present) and explain the impact of those choices.

DOK 2

       
Economic Systems & Institutions        

SS-HS-3.2.1 - Introduce

Students will compare and contrast economic systems (traditional, command, market, mixed) based on their abilities to achieve broad social goals such as freedom, efficiency, equity, security, and growth in the modern world.

DOK 2

       
Production, Distribution, & Consumption        

SS-HS-3.4.2 - Introduce

Students will describe and give examples of how factors such as technological change, investments in capital goods and human capital/resources have increased productivity in the world.

DOK 2

       

SS-HS-3.4.3 - Introduce

Students will explain and give examples of how interdependence of personal, national and international activities often results in international issues and concerns (e.g., natural resurce dependencies, economic sanctions, environmental and humanitarian issues) in the modern world (1500 AD to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 2

       

Use of Geographic Tools 

       

SS-HS-4.1.1 - Master

Students will use a variety of geographic tools (e.g., maps, globes, photographs, models, satellite images, charts, graphs, databases) to explain and analyze the reasons for the distribution of physical and human features on Earth's surface.

DOK 3                

M, MM

O

 

 R

SS-HS-4.1.2

Students will explain how mental maps, the mental image a person has of an area including knowledge of features and spatial relationships, become more complex as experience, study and the media bring new geographic information.   

 

 

 

 

SS-HS-4.1.3
Students will use geographic tools (e.g., maps, globes, photographs, models, satellite images) to interpret the reasoning patterns (e.g., available transportation, location of resources and markets, individual preference, centralization versus dispersion) on which the location and distribution of Earth's human features is based.

 

 

 

 

Regions 

       

SS-HS-4.2.1

Students will interpret how places and regions serve as meaningful symbols for individuals and societies (e.g., Jerusalem, Vietnam Memorial, Ellis Island, the Appalachian region).

 

O

 

 

SS-HS-4.2.2 - Master

Students will explain how physical (e.g., climate, mountains, rivers) and human characteristics (e.g., interstate highways, urban centers, workforce) of regions create advantages and disadvantages for human activities in a specific place.

DOK 2         

M, M

 

O, O

   

SS-HS-4.2.3

Students will explain how people can develop stereotypes about places and regions (e.g., all cities are dangerous and dirty; rural areas are poor).

       

SS-HS-4.2.4

Students will explain how people from different cultures with different perspectives view regions (e.g., Middle East, Balkans) in different ways, sometimes resulting in conflict in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).

       

Patterns 

       

HS-SS-4.3.1 - Master

Students will describe the movement and settlement patterns of people in various places and analyze the causes of that movement and settlement (e.g., push factors such as famines or military conflicts; pull factors such as climate or economic opportunity) and the impacts in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 3                    

M, M

 

O

 

   

HS-SS-4.3.2 - Master

Students will explain how technology (e.g., computers, telecommunications) has facilitated the movement of goods, services and populations, increased economic interdependence at all levels and influenced development of centers of economic activity.

DOK 2                            

M

     

Human-Environment Interaction 

       

SS-HS-4.4.1

Students will explain how humans develop strategies (e.g., transportation, communication, technology) to overcome limits of their physical environment.

       

SS-HS-4.4.2 - Master

Students will explain how human modifications to the physical environment (e.g., deforestation, mining), perspectives on the use of natural resources (e.g., oil, water, land), and natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis, floods) may have possible global effects (e.g., global warming, destruction of the rainforest, acid rain) in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 2                        

M, M

 

     

SS-HS-4.4.3

Students will explain how group and individual perspectives impact the use of natural resources (e.g., mineral extraction, land reclamation).

       
The Factual & Interpretive Nature of History        

SS-HS-5.1.1 - Introduce

Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources, data, artifacts) to analyze perceptions and perspectives (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, nationality, age, economic status, religion, politics, geographic factors) of people and historical events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States History (Reconstruction to present).

DOK 3

       

SS-HS-5.1.2  - Introduce

Students will analyze how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause and effect relationships, tying past to present.

DOK 3

       

 


Work in Progress 

 

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